Contact Us
News Centerhome > News Center > info news
Titanium Physical and Chemical properties
2014-03-18
Titanium Physical properties

metallic element, titanium is recognized for its high strength-to-weight ratio.It is a strong metal with low density that is quite ductile (especially in an oxygen-free environment), lustrous, and metallic-white in color.The relatively high melting point (more than 1,650 °C or 3,000 °F) makes it useful as a refractory metal. It is paramagnetic and has fairly low electrical andthermal conductivity.
Commercial (99.2% pure) grades of titanium have ultimate tensile strength of about 434 MPa (63,000 psi), equal to that of common, low-grade steel alloys, but are 45% less dense. Titanium is 60% more dense than aluminium, but more than twice as strong as the most commonly used 6061-T6 aluminium alloy. Certain titanium alloys (e.g., Beta C) achieve tensile strengths of over 1400 MPa (200000 psi).However, titanium loses strength when heated above 430 °C (806 °F).
Titanium is fairly hard (although not as hard as some grades of heat-treated steel), non-magnetic and a poor conductor of heat and electricity. Machining requires precautions, as the material will soften and gall if sharp tools and proper cooling methods are not used. Like those made from steel, titanium structures have a fatigue limit which guarantees longevity in some applications.Titanium alloys have lower specific stiffnesses than in many other structural materials such as aluminium alloys and carbon fiber.
The metal is a dimorphic allotrope whose hexagonal alpha form changes into a body-centered cubic (lattice) β form at 882 °C (1,620 °F). The specific heat of the alpha form increases dramatically as it is heated to this transition temperature but then falls and remains fairly constant for the β form regardless of temperature. Similar to zirconium and hafnium, an additional omega phase exists, which is thermodynamically stable at high pressures, but is metastable at ambient pressures. This phase is usually hexagonal (ideal) or trigonal (distorted) and can be viewed as being due to a soft longitudinal acoustic phonon of the β phase causing collapse of (111) planes of atoms.

Titanium Chemical properties
 
The Pourbaix diagram for titanium in pure water, perchloric acid or sodium hydroxide.
Like aluminium and magnesium metal surfaces, titanium metal and its alloys oxidize immediately upon exposure to air. Nitrogen acts similarly to give a coating of the nitride. Titanium readily reacts with oxygen at 1,200 °C (2,190 °F) in air, and at 610 °C (1,130 °F) in pure oxygen, forming titanium dioxide. It is, however, slow to react with water and air, as it forms apassive and oxide coating that protects the bulk metal from further oxidation.When it first forms, this protective layer is only 1–2 nm thick but continues to slowly grow; reaching a thickness of 25 nm in four years.
Related to its tendency to form a passivating layer, titanium exhibits excellent resistance to corrosion. It is almost as resistant as platinum, capable of withstanding attack by dilutesulfuric and hydrochloric acids as well as chloride solutions, and most organic acids.However, it is attacked by concentrated acids.As indicated by its negative redox potential, titanium is thermodynamically a very reactive metal. One indication is that the metal burns before its melting point is reached. Melting is only possible in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum. At 550 °C (1,022 °F), it combines with chlorine.It also reacts with the other halogens and absorbs hydrogen.
Titanium is one of the few elements that burns in pure nitrogen gas, reacting at 800 °C (1,470 °F) to form titanium nitride, which causes embrittlement.Because of its high reactivity toward oxygen, nitrogen and many other gases, titanium filaments are applied in titanium sublimation pumps as scavengers for these gases. Such pumps are inexpensive and reliable devices for producing extremely low pressures in ultra-high vacuum systems.